Enfamil Performs Another Round of Tests, Says Formula is Safe




Mead Johnson Nutrition, which produces the Enfamil formula retailers pulled off their shelves last week after a 10-day-old baby died from a rare bacteria that can be found in formula, said that another batch of tests performed on their Enfamil Premium formula did not contain the deadly strain of bacteria.

“Based on both sets of tests, Mead Johnson can say with confidence that Enfamil Premium Newborn formula, like every infant formula the company produces, is safe,” the company said in a statement.

Avery Scott, who died on Dec. 18 after several days of being ill, tested postive for Cronobacter sakazakii bacteria. The newborn had consumed the Enfamil Premium formula, which his parents purchased at a Wal-Mart in Lebanon, MO. While the official source of the bacteria has not yet been determined, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control are expected to be testing a variety of possible environmental sources, including their own tests on the formula.

Retailers such as Wal-Mart and Walgreens removed the 12.5-ounce cans of Enfamil Newborn with the lot number ZP1K7G from stores as a precaution until federal health officials complete tests on the formula. Mead Johnson said it has shared its internal test results with investigators, and reassured parents that its infant formulas undergo more than 2,300 quality tests and checks before they are sent to stores to ensure they meet or exceed all standards set by regulation agencies, including the World Health Organization and the FDA.