CPSC & CBP Working to Protect Families This Holiday Toy Shopping Season




PORT ELIZABETH, N.J. - Today, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Chairman Inez Tenenbaum and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Deputy Commissioner David Aguilar announced at Port Elizabeth, N.J. that more than 2 million units of dangerous or violative toys and children’s products were seized in 2012 and were prevented from reaching the hands of children. CPSC investigators and CBP inspectors are working arm-in-arm at ports across the United States to keep families safe during this holiday toy shopping season. A new report released by CPSC today estimated 193,200 toy-related, emergency department-treated injuries to children younger than 15 years of age occurred in 2011. Many of the incidents were associated with, but not necessarily caused by, a toy. For children younger than 15-years-old, non-motorized scooters continued to be the category of toys associated with the most injuries. Frequently, these injuries involved lacerations, contusions, and abrasions to the child’s face and head. Here are some safety tips that consumers should keep in mind this holiday season:

  • Balloons - Children can choke or suffocate on deflated or broken balloons. Keep deflated balloons away from children younger than 8-years-old. Discard broken balloons immediately.
  • Small balls and other toys with small parts - For children younger than age 3, avoid toys with small parts, which can cause choking.
  • Scooters and other riding toys - Riding toys, skateboards, and in-line skates go fast, and falls could be deadly. Helmets and safety gear should be worn properly at all times, and they should be sized to fit.
  • Magnets – High powered magnet sets are dangerous and should be kept away from children under 14. Building & play sets with small magnets should also be kept away from small children.

Once gifts are open:

  • Immediately discard plastic wrapping or other toy packaging before they become dangerous play things.
  • Keep toys appropriate for older children away from younger siblings.
  • Battery charging should be supervised by adults. Chargers and adapters can pose thermal burn hazards to young children. Pay attention to instructions and warnings on battery chargers. Some chargers lack any mechanism to prevent overcharging. 

  Original content published by CPSC