Expert Tips for Easing Nausea




By Ben Kallen

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“Nausea is more of a symptom than a disease,” says Marsha Kay, M.D., section head of the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology at the Cleveland Clinic. Treating nausea does not necessarily mean you’re treating the underlying condition that caused it, which can range from a relatively harmless problem to a serious medical condition.

1. Try to figure out why the nausea is occurring. If it’s severe, accompanied by persistent vomiting, occurs frequently, or could be the result of an underlying medical condition, consult a doctor.

2. Drink liquids such as water, juice, warm tea or broth. (Avoid acidic juices, including apple juice.)

3. If possible, eat soft, easily digestible foods such as gelatin, crackers, bananas or white toast.

4. Take anti-nausea medication, preferably with a doctor’s advice. Medications containing aspirin-like salicylates shouldn’t be taken by children.

5. Multiple research studies have found that ginger can be an effective nausea remedy. You can purchase ginger tea (or make your own by skinning and boiling fresh ginger root). Some health-food stores sell ginger juice or ginger ale brewed from real ginger. *Ginger shouldn’t be used by children under 2 years old.

6. Peppermint, either as a tea or in gum or candy, may also help settle the stomach, but can also be an irritant. Use cautiously.

7. Acupressure may help relieve nausea, according to a 2004 review of medical literature. Press the P4 point on your inner wrist – it’s three finger-widths down from the crease dividing your wrist from your hand.

8. Practice stress-reduction techniques, or use calming and comforting techniques on your child.