6 DVDs To Get Your Kids Through the Summer




Movies

From our friends at Parents Ask

It’s mid-July, better known as the “I’m Bored” part of summer. The novelty of not going to school has worn off and playing outside in scorching heat doesn’t seem like an appealing option. This is what DVDs are made for.

You don’t need to me to tell you to rent films like Bolt or Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs: most kids can quote them.  However, as the Editor of kids’ movie site KidsPickFlicks, I can direct you to some amazing and entertaining movies which were overlooked in the theaters. The following films are really worth seeing and, most importantly, will capture your kid’s attention while you drive to Yellowstone.

FOR CHILDREN:
The great thing about these three animated films is they’re really smart and don’t speak down to kids, so your older kids will enjoy them as well.

Flushed Away: The premise for Flushed Away sounds as low brow as its title: a mouse living in a mansion gets flushed down the toilet by an intruder mouse bent on stealing his rich existence. It’s a fish out of water story (or a drowned rat story, take your pick) as the privileged mouse realizes the life he’s been missing outside of his wealthy walls. Flushed Away could be the epitome of bathroom humor, but surprisingly, it doesn’t go there. Instead, it’s clever with Airplane-type visual gags about the value of friendship versus the value of money. Bonus:  singing slugs, who could ask for more?

Hoodwinked:  Hoodwinked cleverly re-examines a classic fairy tale “Law and Order” style. For the most part, the original versions of fairy tales are horrific examples of crimes, death, and destruction. Hoodwinked address this element with savvy and investigates what really happened to Little Red Riding Hood, taking the stories of each character to find the truth. It’s a great lesson on not jumping to conclusions or accepting rumor as fact.

Open Season: A story about a tame bear being released into the wild just as hunting season begins, Open Season finds the hilarity in showing the “sport” of hunting from the animals point of view. Also, Open Season subtly deals with substance abuse (candy addiction) and how races often segregate themselves which, if you choose, can open conversations.

From our friends at Parents Ask